Delta Eta

Delta Eta Chapter was founded at University of Utah in Salt Lake City, Utah on November 11, 1932.

Founding Date: Nov 11th, 1932

Status: Active

University:

Location:

District: Eta

The Early Years

The nine founders of Lambda Phi Lambda local chose as their pin an hourglass, to mark time until Kappa Kappa Gamma Fraternity would accept their petition. In 1932, after 13 years of hard work and high hopes, the sands of the Lambda hourglass ran out and 235 actives and alumnae became members of Delta Eta Chapter at the University of Utah. The petition had been accepted at the Colorado Springs Convention of 1932.

Installation ceremonies were conducted on November 11, 1932, by Grand President Alice Tillotson Barney, X-Minnesota, and Field Secretary Helen Snyder (Andres), Beta Pi-Washington, in the Prudential Life building on South Temple Street. Patrons, two of whom were initiated, and Kappa alumnae shared the happy occasion. The alumnae included two, one named Carrie, BE-Barnard, and one named Lillian, E-Illinois Wesleyan, who had taken the petition to the convention. A special song, known as “The Garden Gate Song,” was part of the petition and was later adopted as a Kappa song.

Five other Delta Eta songs appear in the Fraternity songbook: “Kappa Maid,” “Kappa Rhapsodie,” “Panhellenic Song,” “We Are The KKGs” and “I Love Your Blue.”

Housing

The Kappa Kappa Gamma house is located at 33 South Wolcott Street (1455 East) in an area North of the campus known as Federal Heights. The Lambdas had owned or rented several houses before the 1929 acquisition (for $8000) of the eight room red brick bungalow, located close to the campus and other fraternity houses. The chapter was installed there. The house was remodeled at the cost of $15,000 in 1939. In 1963, a large $53,000 addition included five new bedrooms, large kitchen, dining room, TV and card room, three bathrooms, chapter and archives room, utility room, and much more storage space.

Traditions and Honors

Delta Eta scholarship has seen its ups and downs, from first place in early years, to a slump in the 1940s, then back to first place throughout the 1950s, with special awards, and a repeated retirement of the Panhellenic Trophy. Another slump in the 1960s was followed by stringent measures, with bylaws prohibiting pledging under a 2.7 high school average or initiation under 2.5. Officers must maintain a 2.5 overall average. Study tables, tutors, and advisers paid off in the 1970s with the chapter average reaching as high as 3.6 in 1972, and one seventh of the chapter receiving a 4.0 for spring quarter in 1973. Panhellenic no longer awards a trophy because of the passage of “credit-no credit” classes and of withdrawals the last week of school if one is failing a course.

During the chapter’s first ten years a community chest drive had Kappa cooperation; Kappas sold opera tickets and entertained underprivileged children at Christmas time. During World War II Red Cross activities included rolling bandages. The USO exchange was manned by Kappas, and dues were raised to buy war stamps and bonds. After the war the chapter aided in a cancer drive, a Sub-for-Santa project, and fund raising for the Utah State Prison.

In 1952, a project was begun which lasted until 1964—Kappa and Kappa Sigma joined annually to give a party for Salt Lake City underprivileged children with gifts, refreshments, and decorations. In 1965, the Vietnam War interrupted this project. The project continued in 1968 for one year. Then the girls began diverse activities: tutoring slow learners, reading to the blind, and making gifts for Sub-for-Santa. In 1970 there was a central city swim party for underprivileged children and gifts for rest home residents. In 1971 the chapter sponsored a Christmas party for orphans with the Sigma Chis. In 1973 the actives and alumnae raised funds with a Christmas bazaar for promotion of a “Special Olympics” held for handicapped children in the spring at the university stadium. This was a very successful and meaningful project.

Hanging on the living room wall is a Kappa crest created by the mother of a Delta Eta member who was Rush Chairman in 1963. They made the lovely 3-by-5-foot wall hanging as a special surprise and morale-builder. The background is on a cream-colored piece of wool, lined with satin and edged with gold fringe. In the bottom right hand corner is a large gold Delta Eta. The chapter is very proud of this unusual piece.

Delta Eta is honored to own the Maude Gorham key donated by Vilate Crane Shaffer, loyal Delta Eta and past Eta province officer. Maude, Upsilon-Northwestern, was a graduate student when Kappa was petitioned, and she helped secure the charter. The most outstanding junior receives this large antique gold badge each year. In 1963, the original was lost and the chapter appropriated funds for another, exactly the same but a little bit brighter. This key is loved in a special way by Delta Etas. Maude Gorham, a Phi Beta Kappa, taught math, was president of the State Federation of Women’s Clubs, and was a member of many boards. The University of Utah was the first state university in Utah to admit women, but 100 years passed before it granted a woman an honorary Doctor of Laws degree. That woman was Maude Gorham in 1950.

In 1967, the chapter received the key and 50-year pin of long-time adviser and Founders Day dinner speaker, named Lillian who had helped present the petition. Beginning in 1974, the senior graduated with the highest average has her name engraved on a plaque holding Lillian’s key. A large gold wooden key marks the Kappa house, so that it is easily recognized.

Delta Eta Alumnae Association had adopted as its Bicentennial project the writing of the history of the chapter. Funds have been appropriated for framing and reproducing pictures and the comparative history chart to hang in the chapter room, which also serves as its history room. A printed history will be placed in the university library and the chapter archives.

To many Kappas, the name of Phyllis McGinley (Hayden), poet, stands out in Delta Eta’s membership list. She has received the Pulitzer Prize, the Laetare Medal, and the Fraternity’s Alumnae Achievement Award. Another Delta Eta Achievement Award winner in 1974 was Diana Devine Felt, the director of the Great Salt Lake County Mental Health Board. Gayle Olson Gittings is a renowned anthropologist and a producer and writer of “#7 Sunny Street,” a television program in Salt Lake City.

The previous information was excerpted from The History of Kappa Kappa Gamma Fraternity, 1870-1976. The information that follows has been gleaned from available resources including Chapter History Reports, chapter meeting minutes, letters and comments from chapter members and alumnae, the Kappa Kappa Gamma Fraternity Archives, and The Key. Each chapter is expected to update its history record annually. Contact Fraternity Headquarters at [email protected] with questions.

Highlights of the 1970s

n the 1970s, Delta Eta and the University of Utah experienced a growth in numbers of members and students, respectively. The 1978 release and subsequent popularity of the movie, “Animal House” resulted in a record number of students participating in recruitment and Delta Eta proudly took the largest pledge class on campus. Subsequent challenges of growth included sticking to their budget so chapter goals of the decade included fiscal responsibility along with improving scholastic standards. The chapter was known for their hospitality in hosting different men’s fraternities for dinner every week and for their numerous philanthropic programs including fashion shows, dance-a-thons, trick-or-treating with local children, and bed racing to benefit the March of Dimes.

The chapter was proud to note that the First Lady of Utah, Norma Matheson, was a Delta Eta alumna and her daughter, Lou, as well as Mrs. Matheson mother were all members of Delta Eta. The Homecoming Queens of 1978 and 1979 were Delta Eta Kappas. Three chapter members were inducted into the Beehive Honor Society, the University’s oldest society that recognizes achievement in leadership, scholarship, and service. Other members were involved in campus activies including the softball team and the Panhellenic Council.

Highlights of the 1980s

The 1980s saw a continued growth of interest in Greek life across the country and the University of Utah was no different. Large campus and Greek-wide social events drew a great deal of attention from the neighbors of Greek Row. Their lobbying efforts with the Salt Lake City Council to regulate the behavior resulted in a city zoning ordinance that codified procedures for managing fraternity and sorority events including requiring ID’s and a police presence on the properties. In addition, it established boundaries for where fraternity and sororities could grow, leaving out the Delta Eta chapter house at 33 South Wolcott. The chapter was “grandfathered” as a non-conforming use property and allowed to continue to operate in the location and the House Board redecorated the chapter room.

The Delta Eta’s put their creativity to work in developing two favorite rush events inspired by popular movies, the “Sounds of Kappa,” an Austrian-inspired picnic with lederhosen and Kappa-inspired adaptations of songs from “The Sound of Music,” and “Willy Wonka and the Kappa Factory,” with Kappa-loompas and all. In addition to the Spring Brunch honoring graduating seniors sponsored by the Salt Lake City Alumnae Association and the Mother’s Club, members participated in campus clothing drives, the Rose McGill Holiday Sharing Program, and won the Homecoming Songfest competition several times. Social events included Sapphire Ball, Daddy-Daughter BBQ, Nordstrom Fashion Show with Chi Omega, Kappa Jamma Party, Cowboy Party with Kappa Sigma, and Monmouth Duo with Pi Beta Phi.

The chapter faced challenges with collecting dues, but excelled at scholastic achievement and was first in grades on campus. Chapter members could be found participating in the Panhellenic Council, Mortar Board, ASUU (student government), study abroad, staff of the campus newspaper, and serving internships in Washington, DC, with the Hinckley Institute of Politics. The chapter was particularly proud of member Carol Dickson, Miss Teen Utah, who became Miss Teen USA in July of 1987.

Highlights of the 1990s

The 1990’s were characterized by a great deal of change for the University of Utah’s fraternity and sorority community and for the Fraternity. Tensions within the neighborhood between Greek-letter groups and single families continued. The Greek Council adopted more stringent self-regulating policies for events including an agreement for events with more than sixty attendees to be alcohol-free. This coincided with the National Panhellenic Conference resolution on alcohol-free programming and the campus saw a great deal of collaboration and success in this area with the exception of an entanglement between students and police officers at an event at the Kappa Sigma house in 1998 that was later described as a “riot” and drew negative publicity for the Greeks in the Salt Lake community.

Other changes included the Fraternity’s new member program and Delta Eta was selected to be one of 17 chapters to pilot the program in 1997, the same year that they celebrated their 65th anniversary of their founding, which included a birthday party with local alumnae. The National Panhellenic Conference resolution on “no frills” recruitment eliminated the elaborate theme parties but Utah’s Panhellenic created days to focus on Panhellenic unity and the sorority focus on philanthropy. Recruitment was also moved from September to August with the University’s change from quarters to semesters in 1998. These changes were spearheaded by a number of Delta Eta members who were elected to the Panhellenic Council throughout the decade.

In addition to traditional social events like Sapphire Ball, Spring Formal, and the Cowboy Party with Kappa Sigma, Delta Etas developed a tradition of a “Kapp-o-Soup” philanthropy event to benefit a number of local charitable organizations. For a few years they participated in a Utah highway cleanup effort and were assigned a stretch of road in Big Cottonwood Canyon – skiers and hikers alike passed the sign indicating Kappa’s adoption of the road both going up and down the canyon.

Campus involvement of members included student government, Student Alumni Association, and Panhellenic Council. Delta Eta was very proud of member Cori Cannon who was elected to be the Senior Class President for the University in 1998. The chapter also honored alumna member Cherry Moslander Ridges, the campus Greek adviser for nearly thirty years and former Kappa PDC, with an award key named in her honor to be given at Founder’s Day to a Delta Eta member that demonstrates excellence in campus involvement.

Chapter officers especially appreciated the generous gift of a copy machine from the House Board. The Board also redecorated the dining room and card room during the decade.

A New Millennium - Highlights of 2000-2010

Despite smaller new member classes for the U’s Panhellenic community and the closure of the Tri Delta chapter leaving only five NPC chapters on campus in the early 2000’s, Delta Eta members remained actively involved in campus leadership including Panhellenic Council and ASUU (student government). The University’s football team gained notoriety for becoming the first team from a non-BCS conference to play in and subsequently win a BCS bowl, the 2005 Fiesta Bowl, along with winning the 2009 Sugar Bowl. Kappa members actively participated in the rejuvenated MUSS/student section of the games.

The chapter addressed challenges of declining attendance with a focus on improving sisterhood, adopting the Fraternity’s new senior programming options, and improving the efficiency of chapter meetings including the use of email reminders and a website. In addition to the traditional “Kappa Soup” philanthropy, the chapter started a “Kappa Gobble” pie sale during the week of Thanksgiving to benefit the local YWCA shelter. Scholarship was also a focus and the chapter regularly placed first or second in grades for the campus.

In 2007 Delta Eta chapter hosted a tea party at the house with alumnae to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the chapter’s founding. The festivities included an archives display and highlights of the lives of “old” and “new” Kappa members. The event also highlighted the newly redecorated house including the living room, dining room, downstairs bathroom, and upstairs hallways and carpet.

Highlights of 2011

The University of Utah accepted an invitation to join the Pac-10 Athletic Conference with the University of Colorado in 2011, resulting in a name change to the Pac-12.

Highlights of 2012

In 2012, spring semester, Delta Eta received the awards of: Best Philanthropy, Dean's Award of Excellence, and Most Improved GPA from the University of Utah Greek Council. In the fall, Greek council awarded Kappa the Best GPA and outstanding Greek council member to Julia Hicks, a PC-10 Kappa. Outside of the Greek council awards, Kappas were very involved in student government. We had several members who were elected to the ASUU general assembly in 2012. The Senior Class President of the University of Utah was a Kappa, Erika Minjarez.

As traditions go for Delta Eta, all members look forward to the Inspiration Week that takes place in the fall over the week leading into initiation. The first night is the returning of the pin ceremony, where the new members return their pins and become one step closer to initiation. Kappa family night is the next night, where big and little kappa families spend the evening together. The next day is family pass downs and the first part of ritual for the new members. The fourth evening of the week is a progressive dinner with each pledge class. Each pledge class is responsible for preparing a course of a meal to share with the new members (for example: sophomores appetizers, juniors main course, seniors desert). This gives each new member class time to bond with the new members.

The last evening of I-Week is the fireside dinner, where all the members dress in black dresses and the first part of initiation begins. All the new members then proceed to sleep at the Delta Eta Chapter house so they are present for initiation come morning. This week not only bonds the chapter as a whole, but also really brings the new member class closer together with each other.

There were several chapter goals set for Delta Eta in 2012. They varied because they were set to effect different areas of the chapter. A goal for each area: •Self Discovery and Intellectual Development: Use chapter presentations to better educate members about the chapter budget, and present the information in a way that is clear and easy to understand. •Interpersonal Development: Promote year-round involvement in recruitment through events, activities, and public relations •Leadership and Skill Building: Add worth to committee nights by utilizing members and preparing assignments and activities for committee members •Understanding an Appreciation of Kappa: Plan more interactive new member programs that are informative The problem with having multiple goals in each of these areas is that it can be hard to meet multiple goals. This was the case with Delta Eta; the goals were also not designed to be measurable or easily attainable in comparison to the goals set for 2013.

Philanthropies were very successful for 2012. Delta Eta puts on two events per year (one per semester), “Kappa Soup” and “Kappa Gobble”. Kappa Soup takes place in the spring, and it’s an event where local businesses donate soups and everyone who attends can receive unlimited soup for five dollars. Kappa Gobble is similar; it takes place in November and businesses donate different types of pie. Many people on Greek row regard Kappa Gobble as their favorite philanthropy to go to. At Kappa Gobble in November 2012, over $2,500 was raised in just over three hours. Outside of Kappa sponsored events, members of Delta Eta were very philanthropic and participated in individual service events. When teamed with Pi Kappa Alpha, we raised over $3,000 for Relay for Life 2012. This was the second year in a row that Kappa and Pike raised the most money out of any Greek partners.

Approaching 2013, the University of Utah has been ranked 125 in the country by the best colleges and national universities magazine. The total undergraduate population is around 25,000 students. The university also inducted a new president, Dr. David W. Pershing, as it’s 15th president. University of Utah football had a primarily unsuccessful season, only winning a few games. All of campus was excited when we beat our rivals, the BYU Cougars in the annual “Holy War” football game. Kappas were among the many who rushed the field after the victory. ASUU (student government) put on many events, ranging from crimson nights to various types of fundraisers. In the spring, ASUU even booked Wiz Kalifa to perform at the Grand Kerfuffle annual concert. You could always find a group of Kappas at any ASUU event.

Delta Eta Chapter slightly struggled with bonding and sisterhood throughout the year, but has made large improvements in this area entering 2013. Although there were some struggles concerning sisterhood, members never lost enthusiasm. On bid day 2012, the whole chapter welcomed a great new pledge class. In November, Delta Eta held inspiration week which really helped bond all the members. At the end of the week, Delta Eta initiated 35 lovely new girls.

Highlights of 2013

In spring of 2013, Delta Eta was awarded highest GPA out of all the sororities on Campus. We were able to follow it up again during the fall of 2013, and were again awarded first in grades on Greek row at the University of Utah. Delta Eta is proud to say that we have had the highest grades on the University of Utah campus for three semesters in a row.

Sisterhood is a bit of a struggle for Delta Eta; however, over the last year the chapter has come together as a whole and become a stronger group of young women. In the spring, we welcomed 2 new members and in fall we welcomed 39 new members. Delta Eta has grown its sisterhood through date nights, formals, sisterhoods, philanthropy, and Inspiration week. Tradition in Delta Eta is most apparent during Inspiration week. The first night is the returning of the pin ceremony, where the new members return their pins and become one step closer to initiation.

Kappa family night is the next night, where big and little kappa families spend the evening together. The next day is family pass downs and the first part of ritual for the new members. The fourth evening of the week is a progressive dinner with each pledge class. Each pledge class is responsible for preparing a course of a meal to share with the new members (for example: sophomores appetizers, juniors main course, seniors desert). This gives each pledge class time to bond with the new members. The last evening of I-Week is the fireside dinner, where all the members dress in black dresses and the first part of initiation begins. All the new members then proceed to sleep at the Delta Eta Chapter house so they are present for initiation come morning. While the new members are safe and sound in the Delta Eta house, each pledge class also has a sleep over. This week not only bonds the chapter as a whole, but also really brings the pledge classes closer together with each other.

There were several chapter goals set for Delta Eta in 2013. In fall of 2012, Delta Eta was put on a focus letter. The goals that were established in 2013 were set around bringing up chapter moral, getting off the focus letter, and setting the chapter off to a better start to uphold the standards of Kappa and the women involved in the organization. They varied because they were set to effect different areas of the chapter. A goal for each area: •Self-Discovery and Intellectual Development: Receive the gracious living award at convention 2014. •Interpersonal Development: Build unity by increasing personal support of Greek community with sisters. •Leadership and Skill Building: Increase understanding of chapter goals by reviewing chapter plan at each committee meeting. •Understanding an Appreciation of Kappa: Improve appreciation of fraternity by learning a new Kappa fact at each formal meeting.

Philanthropies were very successful for 2013. Delta Eta puts on two events per year (one per semester), “Kappa Soup” and “Kappa Gobble”. Kappa Soup takes place in the spring, and it’s an event where local businesses donate soups and everyone who attends can receive unlimited soup for five dollars. Kappa Gobble is similar; it takes place in November and businesses donate different types of pie. Many people on Greek row regard Kappa Gobble as their favorite philanthropy to go to. At Kappa Gobble in November 2013, over $2,500 was raised in just over three hours. Outside of Kappa sponsored events, members of Delta Eta were very philanthropic and participated in individual service events. With the community in mind, members of Delta Eta helped support the local humane society, the Salvation Army, Primary Children’s Hospital, reading to children at local elementary schools, YWCA, and Shriner’s Children hospital fundraiser carnival.

In February of 2013, twelve members of Delta Eta attended the Province Conference in Boulder, Colorado. While there, members participated in alumni presentations, connected with other Kappas from the region, and strengthened the bonds of sisterhood through a weekend of Kappa related activities. A slight mishap occurred when members were ready to travel home. Because of a large snow storm, a few members and a couple of alumni were stranded at the airport in Colorado. It’s moments like these that connected the girls with the advisers from our chapter and brought them closer together.

Approaching 2014, the University of Utah has been ranked 121 in the country by the best colleges and national universities magazine. The total undergraduate population is around 25,000 students. University of Utah football had a primarily unsuccessful season, only winning a few games. All of campus was excited when we beat our rivals, the BYU Cougars in the final “Holy War” football game for the next three years. ASUU (student government) put on many events, ranging from crimson nights to various types of fundraisers. You could always find a group of Kappas at any ASUU event.

2013 was a primarily successful year for Delta Eta and we are enthused about heading into the new year to create more memories and bond as a sisterhood in Kappa Kappa Gamma.

Highlights of 2014

In spring of 2014, Delta Eta was awarded highest GPA out of all the sororities on Campus. We were able to follow it up again during the fall of 2014, and were again awarded first in grades on Greek row at the University of Utah. Delta Eta is proud to say that we have had the highest grades on the University of Utah campus for five semesters in a row. At our annual Greek Choice awards ceremony on our campus, Delta Eta was awarded best sisterhood on campus out of the six Panhellenic chapters. This was an excellent achievement as the chapter previously struggled with sisterhood.

Sisterhood is a bit of a struggle for Delta Eta; however, over the last year the chapter has come together as a whole and become a stronger group of young women. We as a chapter were ecstatic to celebrate our progression as a sisterhood. In the spring, we welcomed 9 new members and in fall we welcomed 39 new members. Delta Eta has grown its sisterhood through date nights, formals, sisterhoods, philanthropy, and Inspiration week. Tradition in Delta Eta is most apparent during Inspiration week. The first night is the returning of the pin ceremony, where the new members return their pins and become one step closer to initiation. Kappa family night is the next night, where big and little kappa families spend the evening together. The next day is family pass downs and the first part of ritual for the new members. The fourth evening of the week is a progressive dinner with each pledge class. Each pledge class is responsible for preparing a course of a meal to share with the new members (for example: sophomores appetizers, juniors main course, seniors desert). This gives each pledge class time to bond with the new members. The last evening of I-Week is the fireside dinner, where all the members dress in black dresses and the first part of initiation begins. All the new members then proceed to sleep at the Delta Eta Chapter house so they are present for initiation come morning. While the new members are safe and sound in the Delta Eta house, each pledge class also has a sleep over. This week not only bonds the chapter as a whole, but also really brings the pledge classes closer together with each other.

There were several chapter goals set for Delta Eta in 2014. After coming off a focus letter, the chapter improved in various areas over the course of 2013. As a chapter council, 2014 was set to improve Greek community relations, improve chapter relations, and build as a whole. One of the main concerns from member was where their money was being allocated. As a goal for chapter transparency, the treasurer set up a presentation to let members know exactly where their dues were going. Over all, the goals set for 2014 were met and exceeded.

Philanthropies were very successful for 2014. Delta Eta puts on two events per year (one per semester). This past spring we changed our philanthropy to a new event called Kappa Donut Dash. The chapter got together teams of people from the community to run a 5K relay and eat donut holes along the way. Following the race was a small breakfast hosted at the house. In the fall, our chapter hosts a philanthropy event called Kappa Gobble. It’s an event where local businesses donate pies and everyone who attends can receive unlimited pie for five dollars. Many people on Greek row regard Kappa Gobble as their favorite philanthropy to go to. At Kappa Gobble in November 2014, over $2,500 was raised in just over three hours. Outside of Kappa sponsored events, members of Delta Eta were very philanthropic and participated in individual service events. With the community in mind, members of Delta Eta helped support the local humane society, the Salvation Army, Primary Children’s Hospital, reading to children at local elementary schools, YWCA, and Shriner’s Children hospital fundraiser carnival. As a chapter, our philanthropy work isn’t only focused on giving back to the community, but we also help our sisters in need. One of our members was faced with the challenge of more surgeries following her battle with cancer. We as a chapter hosted an event in her honor to raise money for her surgeries. With the help of the Greek community and members of the community as a whole, we were able to raise over $17,000 to help a sister in need.

At Delta Eta, the chapter tries to stress that Kappa isn’t only for four years, but it’s for life. During the fall semester, a Kappa alum reached out to the chapter to ask for help for a sister in need. An older Kappa was diagnosed with ALS and is no longer able to do the necessary things that she need to do to take care of her family. Showing what Kappa truly is has been the main focus of this work. Two of our active members assist her and her family once a week. This has shown the true meaning of Kappa and has helped both the family and the active members involved.

In June 2014, members of Delta Eta attended the Convention meeting in Houston, Texas. While there, members participated in alumni presentations, connected with other Kappas from the country, and strengthened the bonds of sisterhood through Kappa related activities. As a chapter we were recognized for our efforts to fight sexual violence. Delta Eta received the national standards award for our campaign of “Sisters Before Misters.” When the issue of increasing sexual assaults was growing on our campus, our chapter didn’t hold back to fight the issue. As an entire chapter we worked with fraternities on our campus that were having issues with increasing numbers of rapes. As a chapter, Delta Eta was able to improve relations with these houses as well as increase our bonds of sisterhood.

Approaching 2015, the University of Utah has been ranked 121 in the country by the best colleges and national universities magazine. The total undergraduate population is around 25,000 students. ASUU (student government) put on many events, ranging from crimson nights to various types of fundraisers. You could always find a group of Kappas at any ASUU event. Kappas were present all over campus. Being involved with alumni associations, business interns, club sports, and many other opportunities on campus. 2014 was a primarily successful year for Delta Eta and we are enthused about heading into the New Year to create more memories and bond as a sisterhood in Kappa Kappa Gamma.

The President of Delta Eta has a badge that has been passed down since 2007. The back of the badge is inscribed with LRH. Several other women in the chapter wear their relative’s badges, and attached are the pictures of a few. Something special that the Salt Lake Alumni association does with badges is giving pearl drops to those girls with 4.0 GPAs to support academics. Also one member who went to the national convention in 2012 attained a charm that she also wears on her badge. Attached is Jessica Doucette’s badge, a member who has the pearl drop as well as the convention charm on her badge. On the back are her initials as well as her initiation date.

Highlights of 2015

The Delta Eta chapter of Kappa Kappa Gamma has continued to grow and develop during the 2015 year. By the way of chapter population, we have been incredibly fortunate. During spring recruitment, we welcomed nine new members, and we celebrated as we initiated each of them. At the end of spring semester, our chapter watched as 24 members became Alumna when they graduated in May. Following fall recruitment, we welcomed 45 new women, including three legacies into our fraternity. It’s always an exciting time and a boost to sisterhood to see as the PNM goes through recruitment, receives a bid, becomes a full sister following initiation, and eventually gracefully transition to alumna status.

This year during Fall Recruitment, in an attempt to recruit more ‘real’ women, we engaged the potential new members directly in our philanthropy from the get-go. As a part of the parties on Chapter Pride Day, the second day of recruitment, we involved them in our fraternity-wide philanthropic organization of RIF, or Reading Is Fundamental, by coloring bookmarks. Each new member had the opportunity to get to know the women in our chapter and our commitment to philanthropy as they colored bookmarks. They also came to understand how our organization goes beyond four years and can support you for your entire life, as the bookmarks were donated to an alumna’s classroom in a Title 1 school.

Every year, one of the most anticipated and memorable days is Bid Day. We were so fortunate to have two this year, following spring and fall recruitment. There are many traditions that we routinely follow – The seniors collect all of our new members at the union, they each get a T-Shirt, we sit in a circle and introduce ourselves, etc. This year, we decided to add a new tradition. As all the new members come running down the street, the actives take them to the intersection in front of the house where the actives form a large circle around all the new members. We sing “Pat,” and at the chorus where we run to the center, we grab all of the new members and pull them out and teach them the song. It was successfully implemented during Fall Bid Day and was a sisterhood-building exercise.

This year, we combined the old with the new when it came to philanthropy. During the spring, we held a new event, called Kappa Kupcake. Those attending could have as many cupcakes as they could possibly eat for an entrance charge of five dollars. It proved to be very successful, and the money raised went to the Kappa Kappa Gamma Foundation. In the fall, we had two philanthropy events. The first was called Kappa Klassic and it was a golf tournament. The enrollment was lower than expected, but those who did attend had an excellent time. We expect that with time, it will grow in popularity and should become a wildly successful philanthropy event in the years to come. The second philanthropy event in the fall, and by far more successful event, was Kappa Gobble. The premise, as always, is pie for all attendees. The entrance fee is five dollars and all the proceeds went to the Christmas Box House, our local philanthropy for Delta Eta.

As first and foremost college students, academics are always on our mind. Unfortunately, our record among the sororities on campus, has been decreasing. After many semesters as the sorority with the highest GPA on campus, during the spring we dropped to third, following both Chi Omega and Delta Gamma. This caused a new burst of motivation and dedication to our academics. Our Vice-President of Academic Excellence, Joyti Sharma started a new incentive program called, “Hey, Hey, I got an A.” As members got good grades on assignments, project, or tests, they wrote the achievement on a paper listed on a bulletin in the house. During chapter meetings, Joyti would read the names and their accomplishments and each recipient got a piece of candy. This program was wildly successful, and hopefully our grades for this semester will reflect the excitement over, “Hey, Hey I got an A.”

Delta Eta resides on the University of Utah campus and our members are always involved in many of the organizations. Whether it’s UPC, the Alumni Board, ASUU, Intramural sports, or TAing, it is likely that you will find a Kappa nearly everywhere! This spring, the University of Utah was fortunate enough to host Supreme Court Justice, Sonia Sotomayor, as she presented to the students and faculty on her personal experience with overcoming discrimination in her life. It was an incredibly opportunity for every member of the university, student and faculty alike. Justice Sotomayor was exuberant and vivacious as she refused to answer the host’s questions and disregarded the security’s advances to remain on the stage as she went around the Huntsman Center, talking to students.

As mentioned before, Delta Eta has a commitment to our alumna. Not only do we have an incredible Advisory Board who help us daily, but there are other Kappas who we have been able to touch in remarkable ways. One such woman was found by a member of our Panhellenic community. She worked in a nursing home and one of the ladies she cared for was a Kappa Alumna from a different chapter. The old woman would often recount her collegiate days and how much Kappa had meant to her. Our chapter received word and we organized a trip to give her a lavaliere and sing her a song. Following that trip, we learned that her birthday would be over Inspiration Week and we once again visited her, bringing along a few members of the Beta Theta Pi Fraternity, (her favorite fraternity) where they sang her their sweetheart song. This special connection with a sister, though many years apart in age, once again affirmed the sisterhood and connection that Kappa binds us with – one that we hope will be there for us when we are old and sitting in a nursing home.

At the beginning of the year, the chapter came up with a few goals to work towards. The first regarded Chapter Management. We had hoped to readdress the chapter goals every month and ensure that committee meetings always had a purpose. Unfortunately, this seemed to be forgotten as the year progressed. We hope to improve this in the following year. The second chapter goal regarded recruitment. It was expected that Kamp Kappa would be lengthened and that member morale would be improved during recruitment. This was heartily addressed and was a successful change. Recruitment ran more smoothly and we had the largest pledge class on the row following fall recruitment. The final chapter goal regarded campus and community involvement. The chapter felt that we needed to strengthen our reputation in the community. In response to this, Nandini Deo, as Philanthropy Chair, informed members of a wide variety of community opportunities to volunteer and we increased our attendance at Panhellenic and Fraternity activities and philanthropies.

Overall, 2015 has been a success for the Delta Eta Chapter of Kappa Kappa Gamma. Certainly, in the years after, with joy and with laughter, we’ll always remember 2015. Moving forward with such a great year behind us, we look forward to seeing what 2016 has in store.